Experimental musician's gorgeous vinyl collaboration with his grandmother

Clint Heidorn, a musician I've previously posted about, creates haunting, beautiful guitar sounds that are the basis of exquisite, tangible artifacts he makes and sells himself. A few years ago, Clint's grandmother Jane Heidorn suffered a stroke that necessitated her moving into a nursing home, and that led to his latest project. "Hard Times Come Again No More" is a collaboration between Clint and the late Jane Heidorn, now available as a 10" vinyl record in a limited edition of 250 copies. Below, hear the song and read Clint's story of this loving, and lovely, tribute:

Hard Times Come Again No More by Jane Heidorn

In early 2013, my grandmother, Jane Heidorn, moved into a nursing home after a stroke left her unable to care for herself. After over a decade of living alone, she was forced to consider a future without the autonomy she had enjoyed, and - at least initially - it hit her hard.

The move brought her closer to me, and we'd spend Sundays listening to her old 78s on a small record player in her room, eating lunch in the cafeteria, reminiscing. I'd take her outside in her wheelchair and glide it along the twisting walkways that cut through the lawns and shuffleboard courts outside the complex, trying to keep her spirits up, reminding her of bridge games and activities, of the next time I'd visit.

After a few months, I asked if she'd be interested in recording a version of an old Stephen Foster song, "Hard Times Come Again No More".

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Save a person’s life: the fourth sign of a stroke

2.6 million people die in the United States each year.

Stroke is the fifth leading killer in the United States.

795,000 people have a stroke each year.

I had a friend who had a massive bleeding stroke and froze in mid-stride and mid-sentence, like a statue. He later died after life support was turned off.

The ways for folks like you and me to detect a stroke (aside from the person keeling over) were these until a decade or so ago:

S: Smile — If one side of the face droops or doesn’t move, call 911.

T: Talk — Speak a simple sentence. If it comes out garbled, call 911.

R: Raise — Raise both arms. If the person can’t, call 911.

About a decade ago it was discovered that there is a fourth sign that a stroke is taking place: the behavior of the tongue. Ask the person to stick out his or her tongue: if it doesn’t come out straight, but points off to the side in an odd way, call 911. Oddly this hasn’t received the publicity it should.

If you can get a person having a stroke to a hospital and into treatment within a few hours, there are drugs which, if administered rapidly enough, can mitigate the effects. Who knows … you might save a life.

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