Mac users: replace your dock with StatusDuck

David makes fun of me for having so many Menu Bar items. Now that I am using StatusDuck ($15, free to try), he has even more fodder. Lifehacker has the details:

Once you start StatusDuck, all your applications and folders from your dock appear in the menu bar. From there, the menu bar works exactly the same as the dock. You can launch apps, open folders, switch between apps, drag items to the trash, and whatever else. You can also hide any apps you don't want cluttering up the menu bar.

NYPD gathering evidence in Brooklyn Bridge flag prank

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Police in New York City are said to be examining some 18,000 license plate numbers, looking through social media, poring over cell phone communications, and possibly collecting DNA in an investigation into who climbed the Brooklyn Bridge late at night to plant two bleached-white American flags.

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Russian militant leader: evidence of MH17 shootdown shopped, he can tell by the pixels

Alexander Borodai, and the GIF that keeps on giving.

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Ex-CIA officials named in US torture report won't get to read it

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"About a dozen former CIA officials named in a classified Senate report on decade-old agency interrogation practices were notified in recent days that they would be able to review parts of the document in a secure room in suburban Washington after signing a secrecy agreement," reports the AP. Then, on Friday, many were told they would not be able to see it, after all."

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Human Rights Watch report: Surveillance is harming democracy

NSA headquarters, photographed by Trevor Paglen, via HRW.


NSA headquarters, photographed by Trevor Paglen, via HRW.

A new, 120-page report from Human Rights Watch "documents how national security journalists and lawyers are adopting elaborate steps or otherwise modifying their practices to keep communications, sources, and other confidential information secure in light of revelations of unprecedented US government surveillance of electronic communications and transactions."

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Feds say court-ordered wiretaps are harder because more now use chat, IM

Reuters


Reuters

"Federal law enforcement and intelligence authorities say they are increasingly struggling to conduct court-ordered wiretaps on suspects because of a surge in chat services, instant messaging and other online communications that lack the technical means to be intercepted," Ellen Nakashima at the Washington Post reports.

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Unbored – A zillion ways for kids to keep busy and engage with life

I’m always amazed when one of my daughter’s friends comes to me and says she’s bored. As if I’m supposed to put on a pair of tap shoes and dance a jig for her. My daughter knows better than to say the B-word, but I can always tell when she’s at a loss for something to do by the way she lies limply across the arm of the couch, her head dangling towards the floor, her voice depleted of emotion. Next time this happens I will suggest Unbored (which, when she picked it up for the first time yesterday, didn’t put it down for almost an hour).

A collection of inspiring activities, projects, and articles on freeing up your creativity (by the authors as well as many other DIY experts, including an introduction by my husband Mark), Unbored offers a zillion ways to keep busy, stay engaged, and connect with the outside world. Start a band, make a zine, teach “your grown-ups” how to geocache, trick your friends into saving the planet, tell your politicians what you think, build a backyard fort, make a pet robot controller… The book is fun, instructional, edgy (create different colors of fire, take an adventurous gap year between high school and college, spray paint your bedroom walls, read banned books), and has insightful lessons on how to engage with life rather than allowing life to pass by like a boring television commercial. And as a parent, it’s nice to be reminded not to fall into the trap of smothering helicopter parenting, passive parenting (screens!), over-scheduled parenting, and all the other pitfalls of modern life that turn our kids into lethargic, helpless, unthinking slugs. Unbored belongs in every kid’s – and parent’s – library.

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When she finished her pitch, the investor said he didn’t invest in women

"I don’t like the way women think. They haven’t mastered linear thinking."

Morgan Freeman narrates a Juggalo documentary [NSFW]

Here's what happens when you add Morgan Freeman's narration for March of the Penguins to American Juggalo.

Gamers enraged by $7 Portal mod

How dare they not give it away for free!

Reddit plans its crack at advertising

Reddit has billions of page views, but scant revenues to show for it. The New York Times' Mike Isaac explains why it is about to change.

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Video camera attached to car wheel

It's exactly what you expect. Wait an hour or so if you've just eaten!

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Why golfers buy hole-in-one insurance

The chance of getting a hole-in-one is roughly 1 in 12,500 for an amateur golfer. In many countries, anyone making a hole in one is bound by tradition to buy drinks for everyone in the clubhouse. To protect themselves from this potential financial hardship, some golfers buy hole-in-one insurance. Golfers in Japan can buy a premium for $3.

After spending $650 buying the entire clubhouse champagne at England’s South Winchester Golf Club following a hole in one, Paul Neilson told Bloomberg, “I couldn't afford to go through all that again. I used to have a policy but never got around to renewing it.” Among the stories from Japan, the same article quotes Eiji Yoneda, who was one of 200 people invited on a dinner cruise by someone celebrating a hole in one.

Priceonomics

Soldiers swindled

The Atlantic's Rebecca J. Rosen writes about predatory lenders, such as USA Discounters, who extend expensive credit to soldiers, sue them in courts they cannot appear in, then garnish their wages.