Woman creates tiny portable micro-museums

Amanda Schochet created MICRO, a fleet of six foot tall museums that can go anywhere: the DMV, an office lobby, a classroom, wherever. Read the rest

Inflatable delights abound at the Exploratorium in San Francisco

This summer, San Francisco's Exploratorium is hosting an exhibit called Inflatable, featuring air-filled works by several artists. Read the rest

Archie McPhee's Rubber Chicken Museum opens in Seattle

They've been building it up for weeks...

Have you heard? Just 5 days till our RUBBER CHICKEN MUSEUM GRAND OPENING! I heard there might be cake!?! 🍰🐔You don’t wanna miss out on cake do you?

A post shared by Archie McPhee (@archiemcphee) on May 6, 2018 at 4:20pm PDT

Teasing us with build photos of the world's largest rubber chicken...

Adding some… ahem… chicken wire. #rcmuseum

A post shared by Archie McPhee (@archiemcphee) on Apr 23, 2018 at 10:24am PDT

The World’s Largest Rubber Chicken is starting to fill out! (Next will be trimming it down.) #rcmuseum

A post shared by Archie McPhee (@archiemcphee) on Apr 26, 2018 at 9:53am PDT

We don’t want to spoil the unveiling of the World’s Largest Rubber Chicken (happening at the grand opening of the Rubber Chicken Museum at our Seattle store this Friday (you should come))! But here are some pics to whet your appetite. #rcmuseum

A post shared by Archie McPhee (@archiemcphee) on May 9, 2018 at 9:54am PDT

Now, finally, the folks at Archie McPhee have opened the world's first Rubber Chicken Museum at their retail store in Seattle's Wallingford district! The grand opening ceremony for this fowl museum began on Friday at 3 PM, with much fanfare, clucking, and squawking.

The opening of the new @archiemcphee Rubber Chicken Museum is close at hand.

A post shared by Mark Pahlow (@mcpheeceo) on May 11, 2018 at 2:45pm PDT

The museum's curator, the High Priestess of the Rubber Chicken Shana Iverson, used giant novelty scissors for the ribbon cutting, which was broadcast on Facebook Live. Read the rest

The CADO: A pop-up museum celebrating the avocado to open in San Diego

There's the Museum of Ice Cream, and more recently, The Museum of Selfies. Now there's an Instagram-friendly pop-up museum dedicated to California's most iconic fruit, the avocado. It's called The CADO and it opens in June in San Diego. Tickets are available now.

Step into a world of the green you love to ‘gram and emerge with more than a pretty picture (but you’ll get plenty of those, too!). Built out of 16 shipping containers fused together to create an expansive mobile structure, you’ll walk into our lobby and be fully immersed in a story as each exhibit builds on the one before. Get ready to see the California Avocado in a new light as you walk through the skin and into the fruit. Are you shrinking or is the avocado growing?

Follow their Instagram if you want to see lots of avocado toast:

Currently craving. ✌🏼💛🥑 . #DYK California Avocados act as a “nutrient booster” by helping increase the absorption of fat-soluble nutrients like vitamins A, D, K and E. So, we vote #avotoast all day, er’ry day. . 📷: @breakfast_and_bowls

A post shared by the CADO (@thecado.co) on Apr 11, 2018 at 12:09pm PDT

What do you top your toast with? ✌🏼💛🥑 . . 📸: @cultivatewithkruti

A post shared by the CADO (@thecado.co) on Mar 23, 2018 at 6:01am PDT

No right way. ✌🏼💛🥑 . . 📷: @laurennataliephotography

A post shared by the CADO (@thecado.co) on Mar 15, 2018 at 2:59pm PDT

Read the rest

African grain silos repurposed into art museum

Cape Town's Zeith Museum of Contemporary Art Africa was built from an old grain silo complex. Read the rest

Sanitation worker creates eclectic museum from salvaged trash

The Treasures in the Trash Museum in East Harlem is at turns delightful and sad. Curator Nelson Molina is a city sanitation worker with a nice eye and ear for hidden garbage gems. The whole museum demonstrates how utterly wasteful humans are. Read the rest

This robotic arm's cleanup task is bloody endless

The Guggenheim has Sun Yuan & Peng Yu’s installation "Can’t Help Myself" on display through March. The robot arm monitors and attempts to contain a viscous blood-red liquid as it spreads out from the base of the arm, spattering more liquid around its enclosure. Read the rest

George Eastman Museum releases a quarter million photographs online

Thanks to an online platform overhauled and reopened last month, visitors can now view hundreds of thousands of images in the George Eastman Museum collection. Works include vintage materials like Eadweard J. Muybridge's famous photographic studies of animal movement and 450 works by Andy Warhol, including this self-portrait. Read the rest

Fire garden honors 350th anniversary of Great Fire of London

This weekend was the 350th anniversary of the Great Fire of London, so The Tate Modern erected a fire garden with performers and fire-spewing sculptures. Read the rest

National Poo Museum will be crappy in a good way

Next month, the Isle of Wight Zoo in England is opening a National Poo Museum! The new exhibition will include preserved feces from a wide array of animals, from the Lesser Madagascan Tenrec to lions, and of course a 38 million-year-old coprolite, fossilized crap such as the specimen seen above.

"It's stinky, unpleasant and sometimes dangerous stuff — but it’s all around us and inside us too — and perhaps surprisingly our planet would be a much poorer place without it," a museum spokesperson told the County Press. Read the rest

Hello Kitty museum exhibit headed to Seattle in November

The massive museum exhibition "Hello! Exploring the Supercute World of Hello Kitty" will land at Seattle's EMP Museum in November. Read the rest

Open-source 3D scans of museum items generate amazing new creative works

Artist Oliver Laric worked with the Usher Gallery and The Collection in Lincoln to create 3D scans of their collections, then made the files available online. The art that emerged is varied and sometimes astonishing, like the work above by Leah Ferrini. Read the rest

Roast Duck Museum

A new museum opened in Beijing, China dedicated to the history and culture surrounding the traditional dish of roast duck. Read the rest

Medical curiosities in new Harvard Museums exhibit

This beautiful object is a corrosion cast of bronchi and trachea, c. 1880-1890, most likely from a rabbit, sheep, or dog. It's part of the new Body of Knowledge exhibition at the Harvard Museums of Science & Culture.

Corrosion casts have been part of anatomical teaching from the 17th century to the present, particularly for creating display specimens. A rapidly hardening substance, often metal or plastic, is injected into blood spaces or other cavities. Then the tissue is dissolved away by strong acids or bases. This cast was created using a mixture of bismuth, lead, tin, and cadmium. After injection, the tissue was dissolved in potassium hydroxide.

Body of Knowledge: A History of Anatomy (in 3 Parts) Read the rest

Animation of planned LEGO museum

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is designing The LEGO House, an "experience and education centre” in LEGO's home of Billund, Denmark. According to LEGO Group owner Kjeld Kirk Kristiansen, The LEGO House, slated to open in 2016, "will show the past, present and future of the Lego idea…. and the Lego House gives us an opportunity to make it very tangible what Lego play offers and how it stimulates children’s creativity and learning." Sadly, the architects have not yet built a model of the structure from LEGO. Instead, they released the animation above. "BIG Plans for a Lego Museum in Denmark" (Smithsonian) Read the rest

Museum inside a freight elevator

Hidden inside a nondescript freight elevator in a NYC TriBeCa alley lies Museum, a delightful cabinet-of-curiosities drawing from weird collections around the globe. Museum is now open for its second season and includes such items as: "Personal Ephemera from Al Goldstein, The Rocks and Tools from Tom Sach's Mars expedition, Objects Made For Prisoners or by Prisoners in US Prisons, Fake Vomit from Around the World, Tip Jars collected by Jim Walrod, Surf and Turf Potato Chips, and more."

Museum Read the rest

High-rez scan of Einstein's brain slide from Philadelphia's Mütter Museum

Last week, I toured Philadelphia's Mütter Museum -- the Philadelphia College of Surgeons' astounding collection of pathological oddities -- and was treated to a sneak peak at the museum's latest acquisition: 46 microscope slides from Albert Einstein's brain. They were donated by Dr. Lucy Rorke-Adams, one of the College's trustees. Mütter curator Anna Dhody was kind enough to scan one of the slides at high resolution for us, and you can click through the image above to get it at full rez. The slides are now part of the Mütter's permanent collection, and are just another reason to visit this remarkable collection.

The slides were prepared in 1955 in the pathology lab of Dr. William Ehrich, Chief of Pathology at the Philadelphia General Hospital and the Graduate School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania. Five sets of slides were prepared in the lab, one set was given to Dr. Ehrich by Thomas Harvey, MD, the physician who performed the post-mortem exam on Einstein at Princeton Hospital.

After Dr. Ehrich died in 1967, his widow gave them to Allen Steinberg, MD. Dr. Steinberg gave them to Lucy Rorke-Adams, MD, Senior Neuropathologist, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Clinical Professor of Pathology, Neurology and Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania, and a longtime Fellow of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia.

Mütter Museum Read the rest

More posts