1985 design for Pepsi Cola can made for astronauts

From the Moving Beyond Earth exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC: a Pepsi can designed for astronauts!

In 1984, researchers for Coca Cola had an idea about dispensing carbonated beverages in space to give astronauts more choices to drink and also to create a stellar advertising opportunity. The company developed a can that would work in weightlessness to keep the cola fizzy without spewing out of the can. NASA agreed to let the astronauts try the Coke device on a Shuttle flight. When Pepsi learned of this project, it also wanted to participate and developed its own container. Both Coke and Pepsi products were flown on the STS 51-F mission in 1985 so crew members could evaluate the dispensers and do a taste test. Results were mixed and NASA did not add either company's product to the Shuttle food pantry; the mid-1980s "Cola Wars" continued on earth but not in space. NASA gave the Museum this extra Pepsi can that was modified for spaceflight.

Image: Moving Beyond Earth exhibition at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.

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Robert Hulseman, creator of the Red Solo Cup, RIP

Robert Hulseman, creator of the iconic Red Solo Cup seen at frat parties, sizzurp celebrations, and Midwestern family reunions everywhere, has died at age 84. Hulseman, with friend Jack Clements, followed up that iconic container design with another: the Solo traveler coffee cup lid, such a classic design that one of them is now in the New York Museum of Modern Art. From NPR:

Solo was one of the first companies to market small paper cone cups that were common to see alongside water coolers in the 1940s.

The company went on to develop the wax-lined cups used by drive-in movie theaters and fast-food restaurants.

In the 1970's, Hulseman invented the Red Solo Cup for families to use at picnics but use of the ubiquitous cup took off and it was embraced by all beverage drinkers.

Paul Hulseman, Robert's son, told The Associated Press that "his father never fully understood how massively popular the large red plastic cup became in pop culture."

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