Freedom sounds like fighter-jets


This ad hearkens back to the days before America came to mistrust its military-industrial complex, the dreamtime when the scream of jets was a sound to comfort your children.

Freedom Has a New Sound

Data viz: whom did the UK government invite to emergency talks about the health reform bills?


Dr Ben "Bad Science" Goldacre sez, "I did a really sophisticated and complex data visualisation. I think you might enjoy it. There's definitely a pattern in there, I just need to decide what statistical tests will best extract the signal from the noise."

Who is, and is not, invited to Cameron's emergency NHSbill summit? A data visualisation.

$5,075 loan from Western Sky Financial will cost you $40,872.72

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Western Sky Loans boasts that it's "not a Payday Loan!" Whatever it is, a 116.73% APR on a $5,075 loan seems a bit steep. After 84 monthly payments you'll have spent $40,872.72 paying it back.

$5,075 loan from Western Sky Financial will cost you $40,872.72 (Via imgur)

Dan Kaminsky on the RSA key-vulnerability

Dan Kaminsky sez,

There's been a lot of talk about some portion of the RSA keys on the Internet being insecure, with "2 out of every 1000 keys being bad". This is incorrect, as the problem is not equally likely to exist in every class of key on the Internet. In fact, the problem seems to only show up on keys that were already insecure to begin with -- those that pop errors in browsers for either being unsigned or expired. Such keys are simply not found on any production website on the web, but they are found in high numbers in devices such as firewalls, network gateways, and voice over IP phones.

It's tempting to discount the research entirely. That would be a mistake. Certainly, what we generally refer to as "the web" is unambiguously safe, and no, there's nothing particularly special about RSA that makes it uniquely vulnerable to a faulty random number generator. But it is extraordinarily clear now that a massive number of devices, even those purportedly deployed to make our networks safer, are operating completely without key management. It doesn't matter how good your key is if nobody can recognize it as yours. DNSSEC will do a lot to fix that. It is also clear that random number generation on devices is extremely suspect, and that this generic attack that works across all devices is likely to be followed up by fairly devastating attacks against individual makes and models. This is good and important research, and it should compel us to push for new and interesting mechanisms for better randomness. Hardware random number generators are the gold standard, but perhaps we can exploit the very small differences between clocks in devices and PCs to approximate what they offer.

Primal Fear: Demuddling The Broken Moduli Bug (Thanks, Dan!)

Pin-up art on old fruit-crate labels


In the Vintage Ads LiveJournal group, a contributor called Noluck-Boston is currently digging up a fantastic set of cheesecake/pin-up fruit crate labels of yesteryear. Here's Foot-High Melons, and On Rush Vegetables.

Education is a snap at the Central Institute of Technology in Australia


A charming advertisement for a college down under, by Henry and Aaron. Stay to the end. Send the kids out the room. [via Gizmodo]

Ordeal on the Isle of the Everlasting Dead

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"The four posts of the death-machine tipped off Lang's fate: They were going to tear him apart -- nice and slow!"

(Via Subtropic Bob)

Oh my God, entertainment industry people are still pitching for SOPA

You'd think that the proponents of SOPA[1] would give up that legislative dead parrot's ghost. But they're still doing the rounds on radio and in print, claiming that millions of Americans were 'duped' into opposing their harmless little internet censorship law.

The fresh (!) talking points go like this: Wikipedia, Reddit, Boing Boing and others 'lied' to the public about what SOPA was in the crucial final moments, 'abused our power' by going dark for a day, and thereby tricked legislators and the public into turning on a much-needed new law.

What rot.

Read the rest

How to optimize your caffeine intake: there's an app for that

Tim O'Reilly tweeted: "Quantified self for caffeine addicts -- IOS app to optimize intake. (Didn't know half-life in body was 5 hours!)"

201202171117 Two doctors at Penn State University have developed Caffeine Zone, a free iOS app that tells you the perfect time to take a coffee break to maintain an optimal amount of caffeine in your blood — and, perhaps more importantly, it also tells you when to stop drinking tea and coffee, so that caffeine doesn’t interrupt your sleep.

How to optimize your caffeine intake

MC Chris cartoon show

Nerdcore rapper MC Chris is getting his own cartoon show, which apparently involves zombies, the music industry and profanity. Just as it should.

the mc chris cartoon teaser trailer (via Neatorama)

Cop spends weeks to trick an 18-year-old into possession and sale of a gram of pot

More fun from the self-loathing society: This American Life had a show about how young female undercover cops infiltrated a high school and flirted with boys to entrap them into selling pot, so they could charge them with felonies and destroy their lives at an early age.

Last year in three high schools in Florida, several undercover police officers posed as students. The undercover cops went to classes, became Facebook friends and flirted with the other students. One 18-year-old honor student named Justin fell in love with an attractive 25-year-old undercover cop after spending weeks sharing stories about their lives, texting and flirting with each other.

One day she asked Justin if he smoked pot. Even though he didn't smoke marijuana, the love-struck teen promised to help find some for her. Every couple of days she would text him asking if he had the marijuana. Finally, Justin was able to get it to her. She tried to give him $25 for the marijuana and he said he didn't want the money -- he got it for her as a present.

A short while later, the police did a big sweep and arrest 31 students -- including Justin. Almost all were charged with selling a small amount of marijuana to the undercover cops. Now Justin has a felony hanging over his head.
Sick: Young, Undercover Cops Flirted With Students to Trick Them Into Selling Pot (Via Aurich Lawson)

The infinite cycle of Soap


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For people who still think it's important to shower with soap, this is neat: a piggybacking soap bar system. When the bar of soap becomes a sliver, you just stick it into the hollow part of a new bar of Stack soap.

Soap bars that join together - STACK

Canada's spying bill also allows appointed "inspectors" unlimited access to ISP data

Criticism of C-30, Canada's proposed domestic spying law, has focused on the fact that the police could access certain kinds of ISP subscriber information without a warrant. But as Terry Milewski writes on the CBC, the bill also gives the government the power to appoint special inspectors who can monitor and copy all information that passes through an ISP, also without a warrant.

The inspector, says the bill, may "examine any document, information or thing found in the place and open or cause to be opened any container or other thing." He or she may also "use, or cause to be used, any computer system in the place to search and examine any information contained in or available to the system."

You read that right. The inspector gets to see "any" information that's in or "available to the system." Yours, mine, and everyone else's emails, phone calls, web surfing, shopping, you name it. But, if that sounds breath-taking enough, don't quit now because the section is still not done.

The inspector — remember, this is anyone the minister chooses — is also empowered to copy anything that strikes his or her fancy. The inspector may "reproduce, or cause to be reproduced, any information in the form of a printout, or other intelligible output, and remove the printout, or other output, for examination or copying."

Oh, and he can even use the ISP's own computers and connections to copy it or to email it to himself. He can "use, or cause to be used, any copying equipment or means of telecommunication at the place."

In short, there's nothing the inspector cannot see or copy. "Any" information is up for grabs. And you thought the new airport body scanners were intrusive?

Online surveillance bill opens door for Big Brother (Thanks, Craig!)

DRM gives companies security -- from competition


Last night, Rob posted a very good piece on Apple's new "Gatekeeper" technology, which defaults to warning users of Apple's new Mountain Lion OS that software from companies that haven't been officially recognized by Apple should not be installed (though users can still choose to override it, or turn it off).

But I have one rather large quibble with Rob's piece. He wrote:

The truth is that Macs don't currently suffer much from malicious software, and DRM-esque lockouts are always circumvented. So what's the point of a DRM-esque system for malware prevention?

I agree that DRM is always circumvented, and it is especially circumvented by copyright infringers and malware creators. But I think that Rob has misunderstood the primary value of DRM to technology companies: because many countries' laws prohibit breaking DRM even if you're not doing anything illegal, DRM gives companies the right to sue competitors who make compatible products and services.

The law has always recognized that interoperability is good for competition, markets, and the public. From generic windshield-wiper blades and hubcaps to third-party hard-drives and keyboards and inkjet toner, and software like Pages and Keynote, the law recognizes that there is a legitimate reason to reverse-engineer a competitor's products and make new products that replace, expand and augment them.

Read the rest

Fallout shelter ads


On the always-excellent How to Be a Retronaut site, a great collection of 1960s fallout shelter ads, a perfect capsule of upbeat, cheerful fear-selling.

Fallout Shelter Ads, 1960s