Sociopathic Superman comics

Superman can be a real jerk! "Comics Showing Superman Crazy Sociopath WTF Funny" (Happy Place)

UPDATE: Ah! Turns out, this is a dupe of Cory's 2006 dupe of Mark's 2005 post pointing us to Superdickery where it seems this gallery first appeared! A natural classic! Read the rest

Security companies and governments conspire to discover and hide software vulnerabilities that can be used as spyware vectors

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Marcia Hoffman writes about security research companies that work to discover "zero day" vulnerabilities in software and operating systems, then sell them to governments and corporations that want to use them as a vector for installing spyware. France's VUPEN is one such firm, and it claims that it only sells to NATO countries and their "partners," a list that includes Belarus, Azerbaijan, Ukraine, and Russia. As Hoffman points out, even this low standard is likely not met, since many of the governments with which VUPEN deals would happily trade with other countries with even worse human rights records -- if Russia will sell guns to Syria, why not software exploits? VUPEN refuses to disclose their discoveries to the software vendors themselves, even for money, because they want to see to it that the vulnerabilities remain unpatched and exploitable for as long as possible.

“We wouldn’t share this with Google for even $1 million,” said VUPEN founder Chaouki Bekrar. “We don’t want to give them any knowledge that can help them in fixing this exploit or other similar exploits. We want to keep this for our customers.” VUPEN, which also “pwned” Microsoft’s Internet Explorer, bragged it had an exploit for “every major browser,” as well as Microsoft Word, Adobe Reader, and the Google Android and Apple iOS operating systems.

While VUPEN might be the most vocal, it is certainly not the only company selling high-tech weaponry on the zero-day exploit market. Established U.S. companies Netragard, Endgame, Northrop Grumman, and Raytheon are also in the business, according to Greenberg.

Read the rest

Spiders made from TSA-confiscated scissors

Sculptor Christopher Locke makes the most amazing spiders out of scissors -- but not just any scissors. Scissors that the TSA confiscated and auctioned off.

Although the TSA website says scissors with blades less than four inches are allowed on airplanes, the individual officers conducting the screening have the authority to confiscate anything they think could be used as a weapon. As a result, hundreds of pairs of scissors are confiscated daily at American airports.

Scissor Spiders (via Colossal) Read the rest

Bubblegum label-writer

In the Boing Boing store, a bubblegum-based label-writer. Feed it with any standard bubblegum tape, and stamp your message into it before you begin your chewy chewing for choosy chewers.

Bubble Roll Message Maker Read the rest

130 Simpsons episodes at once

Romssonson created a single YouTube video displaying a grid of 130 miniature Simpsons episodes:

About the video:

-Top to bottom: each row shows a season (from season 1 to season 10)

-Left to right: each column shows an episode (from episode 1 to episode 13)

A total of 130 episodes is displayed, framerate is 25fps, thumbnails have been captured at 80x60px

Watching +100 The Simpsons episodes at the same time (experiment) (via Kottke)

Read the rest

Make: Talk 011 - Yury Gitman, Toy Inventor

Here's the 11th episode of MAKE's podcast, Make: Talk! In each episode, I interview one of the makers featured in the magazine.

Our maker this week is Yury Gitman. Yury's a toy inventor and a product designer who teaches physical computing and toy design at Parsons The New School for Design in New York. In the current issue of MAKE, Volume 29, Yury co-wrote an article about his Pulse Sensor, a wearable heart beat sensor that he created with his colleague Joel Murphy.

Before the interview with Andy, I mention a cool project on our website. It's a guide on how to harvest and use squid ink, which you can use for cooking or printing. It was written by cofounder Christy Canida.

Read the rest

How a high roller took millions off three Atlantic City casinos without cheating

Mark Bowden's Atlantic article tells the story of Don Johnson, a high-rolling gambler who broke the bank at three Atlantic City casinos without card-counting or other "cheats."

Years ago, I was mildly obsessed with understanding casino economics and cheats, and read a bunch of books on how to win (or at least lose slowly) at a casino. The consensus among the experts I read was to realize that most skill-based casino games are only mildly "negative expectation" (that is, if you play them with perfect statistical strategy, you'll lose a little money over time). Also, most casinos distribute "comps" (freebies) to make up about forty percent of your estimated losses. These losses are calculated by pit bosses who keep an eye on consistent gamblers and observe the size of your normal bet and the tightness of your play, then make a guess at how much you're losing per hour, and multiply that by the number of hours you spend at the table (or at least, they did -- some casinos now use automated stored-value wagering cards that eliminate the need for estimation).

The secret to converting the negative expectation game to a positive expectation game was to trick the pit bosses. Play very slowly when the pit boss isn't watching, making the minimum bet on each hand and losing as slowly as possible. When the pit boss comes by to look, start playing fast and loose, and increase your bet-size. If the ruse works, the pit-boss will be tricked into comping you enough freebies to make your play pay, even if only by a little. Read the rest

Sponsor shout-out: ShanaLogic

Thank you to our sponsor ShanaLogic, sellers of handmade and independently designed durable goods, apparel, delightful gifts, and other fine kit. Check out this clever unisex " Read the rest

Regina Spektor: new video for "All the Rowboats"

Regina Spektor is a Russian-born, classically-trained pianist who started making the downtown NYC avant-folk scene as a singer-songwriter in the late 1990s. She eventually rose to international prominence with her exquisite fourth album, "Begin to Hope" (2006), featuring the popular single "Fidelity." My whole family has enjoyed her music for years and so I was delighted when I heard some time ago that Regina really digs BB! Above is Regina's new video for "All the Rowboats," from her album "What We Saw From the Cheap Seats" due out in May. The video was directed by Adria Petty (yes, daughter of Tom), who also directed the "Live In London: Regina Spektor" concert film. Read the rest

Building spilling books

"Biografias," an installation by Alicia Martin at Casa de America, Madrid. "5,000 Books Pour Out of a Building in Spain" (via Imaginary Foundation) Read the rest

Canada to stop issuing pennies, businesses told to round off to nearest 5 cents, or "work it out for themselves"

The Canadian Tory government has announced that it's discontinuing the minting of new pennies, as the coins are expensive and considered a "nuisance" by businesses and their customers. As Steven Chase writes in the Globe and Mail:

“It costs taxpayers a penny-and-a-half every time we make one,” Finance Minister Jim Flaherty told the Commons, adding the move will save taxpayers $11-million annually.

...The increasing scarcity of pennies means Canadians will have to get used to cash transactions being rounded off if they’ve got no pennies on hand.

Ottawa is suggesting businesses round off cash transactions to the nearest five-cent increment but says it’s leaving this to businesses to work out for themselves.

When I was (briefly) at the University of Waterloo, the Engineering faculty's cafeteria had an option to dispense with change altogether: when your bill was added up, you could opt to gamble on rounding, with the direction -- up or down -- dependent on your change. In other words, if you had $3.83 owing to you, you'd have an 83% chance of getting $4 back, and a 17% chance of getting $3 back.

The federal budget’s one-cent solution (via Consumerist)

(Image: CANADA, GEORGE V 1920 ---FIRST ISSUE, SMALL ONE CENT a, a Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike (2.0) image from woodysworld1778's photostream) Read the rest

New York City Dept of Education's "banned" words list

You've likely heard that the New York City Department of Education wants to avoid the user of certain words or phrases on standardized tests if "the topic is controversial among the adult population and might not be acceptable in a state-mandated testing situation; the topic has been overused in standardized tests or textbooks and is thus overly familiar and/or boring to students; the topic appears biased against (or toward) some group of people." The list of the words and phrases is below. I suggest reading it aloud -- it sounds like Beat poetry!
Abuse (physical, sexual, emotional, or psychological), Alcohol (beer and liquor), tobacco, or drugs, Birthday celebrations (and birthdays), Bodily functions, Cancer (and other diseases), Catastrophes/disasters (tsunamis and hurricanes), Celebrities, Children dealing with serious issues, Cigarettes (and other smoking paraphernalia), Computers in the home (acceptable in a school or library setting), Crime, Death and disease, Divorce, Evolution, Expensive gifts, vacations, and prizes, Gambling involving money, Halloween, Homelessness, Homes with swimming pools, Hunting, Junk food, In-depth discussions of sports that require prior knowledge, Loss of employment, Nuclear weapons, Occult topics (i.e. fortune-telling), Parapsychology, Politics, Pornography, Poverty, Rap Music, Religion, Religious holidays and festivals (including but not limited to Christmas, Yom Kippur, and Ramadan), Rock-and-Roll music, Running away, Sex, Slavery, Terrorism, Television and video games (excessive use), Traumatic material (including material that may be particularly upsetting such as animal shelters), Vermin (rats and roaches), Violence, War and bloodshed, Weapons (guns, knives, etc.), Witchcraft, sorcery, etc.
"50 words banned from NYC school tests" (

"New York city schools want to ban 'loaded words' from tests" ( Read the rest

Classics of Internet Art

Over at MyLifeScoop, a site created by one of our sponsors, Intel, I wrote about Ken Goldberg's Telegarden (1995), Eric Paulos's Limelight (2004), and other classic Internet artworks.

Cyberspace is no longer a place we go to through our desktop or laptop screens, but an overlay on top of our physical reality. In fact, the most fertile ground for experimentation is where the real and the virtual blend together. As a card-carrying "futurist," one of my favorite places to look for experiments that point to where things are headed is within the world of art. Artists tend to push on the questions that we'll all be asking years later. And in the process, they often grapple with emerging technologies in unpredicted ways.

"Classics of Internet Art" Read the rest

Suzanne Ciani: music of Atari, pinball, and Star Wars Disco

If you've ever heard Meco's classic space disco version of the Star Wars theme, or played the Xenon pinball machine, or saw the original Atari TV commercials, then you've heard the pioneering electronic music of Suzanne Ciani. From her earliest days studying with Don Buchla at UC Berkeley and Max Mathews at Stanford to her commercial work in the 1970s and 1980s to Grammy-nominated New Age music in the 1990s, Ciani has been a prolific composer and electronic music innovator. Here is a 1979 interview with her about creating the sounds for Bally's Xenon pinball machine:

The excellent Finders Keepers Records has just issued Suzanne Ciani: Lixiviation, a fantastic collection of her early recordings -- TV spots, corporate IDs, advertising jingles, and other short bits of brilliance. Check out her music for an Atari Liberator television commercial:

From Finders Keepers:

A classically trained musician with an MA in music composition this American Italian pianist was first introduced to the synthesizer via her connections in the art world when abstract Sculptor and collaborator Harold Paris introduced Suzanne to synthesizer designer Don Buchla who created the instrument that would come to define Ciani's synthetic sound (The Buchla Synthesiser). Cutting her teeth providing self-initiated electronic music projects for art galleries, experimental film directors, pop record producers and proto-video nasties Suzanne soon located to New York where she quickly became the first point of call for electronic music services in both the underground experimental fields and the commercial advertising worlds alike. Counting names like Vangelis and Harald Bode amongst her close friends Suzanne and her Ciani Musica company became the testing ground for virtually any type of new developments in electronic and computerized music amassing an expansive vault of commercially unexposed electronic experiments which have remained untouched for over 30 years… until now.
Read the rest

Perfect illustration in a 1941 shaving cream ad

The illustration in this 1943 Listerine shaving ad is totally perfect, and really makes the case that the MAD Magazine parodies of old time ads were basically faithful recreations. I love that they gave the guy a double chin.

Listerine Shaving Cream Read the rest

3 days until the release of “The Art of Daniel Clowes: Modern Cartoonist”! (…plus your chance to win an autographed copy today)

…and our countdown continues with more Clowes oddities that couldn’t be included in the book.

Design dept:

Daniel Clowes: “The only valuable class I took in art school was from a guy who taught display lettering which was literally like sign painting. Everybody else was like, ‘Aww man, I can’t believe I have to take this cornball class,’ where I was front and center every week. Still to this day I use everything I learned in that class.”

Clowes created this font for the movie Art School Confidential. Read the rest

Drunkard's serenade: "Bohemian Rhapsody" from the back of a police car

Here is a man who has apparently been arrested for intoxication in an unknown jurisdiction, disputing the charge from the back of a police cruiser by belting out a genuinely soulful rendition of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody." Skip to 3:40 for "Scaramouche! Scaramouche!"

Arrested Drunk Guy Sings Bohemian Rhapsody (Thanks, Fipi Lele!) Read the rest

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